Tag Archives: travel

Swimming pools, Argan Oil and Goats in Trees

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Swimming pools, Argan Oil and Goats in Trees

Marrakech Part 4:

The morning of our 5th day in Marrakech we checked out of our riad in the medina and headed out of town.  We booked our last couple of days in Morocco at a fancy resort.

Kenzi Menara Palace

Kenzi Menara Palace

Fancy hotels even give you free slippers!

Fancy hotels even give you free slippers!

Cathy, Jessica and Catherine spent the day with us as well.

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Leslie with my buddy Cathy

We checked in and changed into our bikinis right away.  Well, Mike wore trunks, sorry ladies!

Cool California girls in the sun

Cool California girls in the sun

The girls played in the pool while Mike, Cathy and I lounged in the sun. We visited and sipped our drinks under the warm African sun.  We savored our last day with Cathy as she would be heading off on an adventure to the desert in the morning.  They drove across the Atlas mountains to the end of the civilized world then continued on dromedary back.  Cathy is going to have to write a guest post so we can find out the details of their adventure! unnamed

Cathy, Jessica and Catherine's camel ride looks more authentic than ours!

Cathy, Jessica and Catherine’s camel ride looks more authentic than ours!

Our last day we enjoyed an amazing, exotic buffet at the Kenzi Palace. My favorite was a fruit spread that was made of mashed oranges, cinnamon and honey. I ate it on warm Moroccan bread. Heavenly!

To me no trip is complete without a good hike or even better, a really long trail run.  We spent the majority of our time in Morocco in Marrakech so we were ready for some nature. Abdul, our driver who took us to ride the dromedaries, picked us up at the hotel.  The plan was to visit a Berber village in the Atlas mountains and go for a hike. As we drove out of town Abdul explained that we were headed to the Ouika Valley. We drove for an hour to a Berber village called Setti Fatma which I imagined would be a remote, quaint little village. Instead, as we neared the village the road became dense with cars. We stopped at an Argan Oil Co-op where the women demonstrated how the argan nuts are cracked then ground and turned into oil.

Sky and Savvy sitting with the Argan nut ladies

Sky and Savvy sitting with the Argan nut ladies

Sit right here, I'll be right back with my samples

Sit right here, I’ll be right back with my samples

Our new friend, Ilham

Our new friend, Ilham

Our guide was delightful, the girls liked her immediately and they even let her braid their hair.

Looking at the Atlas Moutains

Looking at the Atlas Moutains

We bought several bottles of magical Argan Oil.  She promised that one was specifically formulated to clear skin blemishes.  I was skeptical but before bed that night Sky put the oil on a little patch of acne on her nose.  Amazingly after one application and a day of swimming in the sun the next day the patch had completely resolved.  Youth, the sun or the oil? Your guess is as good as mine.

Our next stop was a rug store.  Of course we were perfectly aware that our guide had a vested interest in our purchases and I had no intention of buying a rug but we were curious just the same.

Savvy with the rugs

Savvy with the rugs. Give her a job!

Buried in Rugs!

Buried in Rugs!

The man in the rug store showed us rug after rug but wouldn’t give me any idea of the prices unless I would choose one.  Strangely, it was very rushed and stressful.  Finally I told him that I liked one and he told me the price. It was outrageous and I suggested that we leave.  Suddenly the price was a 1/3 of his original offer.  I know that is typical but I was surprised. We left and I think our driver was a little annoyed with us.

Of course, Sky found a friendly kitty amongst the rugs

Sky, the cat whisperer, found a friendly kitty amongst the rugs

The “typical” Berber village turned out to be a typical tourist trap but it was still exotic to us and we enjoyed it.  We dined on a sandy bank of the Ourika river on plastic tables under colorful umbrellas.

Waiting for lunch on the bank of the ___ river

Waiting for lunch on the bank of the Ourika river

Cheesy strolling minstrels played for us and posed for pictures. 

Sky ate eggs and as usual, a pack of stray cats found her.

Sky is a cat magnet!

Sky is a cat magnet!

After lunch our hiking guide, Jamal was waiting for us.  He was a cheerful, 25 year old who spoke excellent English and even some Spanish.  Jamal told us he grew up in Setti Fatma.  He learned his English in school and explained that schools in Setti Fatma are taught in Arabic and French.  Anyone who attends school is fluent in both. He also spoke Berber but pointed out that he could not read or write the language of his ancestors as it has a different alphabet and it is not taught in the schools.  Jamal led us through a cacophony of vendors on the way up the mountain.

Up the hill past 100s of tables of stuff for sale.

Up the hill past 100s of tables of stuff for sale.

for sale

for sale

stuff

stuff

 

I love to shop but this was really too much even for me.  We finally passed most of the hikers and shoppers.

Up the trail to the 7 waterfalls

Up the trail to the 7 waterfalls.

Jamal pointed out the “Berber refrigerators”.  Cold snow-melt, running off the mountain keeps drinks cool in gaudy painted fountains.

The Berber Refrigerator

The Berber Refrigerator

Once past the many blankets and little tables of stuff for sale the only way to continue was to hop across streams and climb over boulders.  Now we were hiking!

Mike and Savannah picking their way through the rocks

Mike and Savannah picking their way through the rocks. Mike is always sure to be behind just in case someone falls.

Sky, Jamal and Savannah

Sky, Jamal and Savannah

What a view, see the village below?

What a view, see the village below?

We hiked for several hours and counted the 7 waterfalls. We were thankful that our girls had good stamina and balance. They could climb straight up the mountain. Much like this goat:

Moroccan goats can climb trees!

Moroccan goats can climb trees!

We came across one goat stuck in a tree.  He cried until his shepherd could climb up and help him out. Jamal was a great guide, he was patient and clearly loved his job.  He was in his element and let us know that getting paid to show foreigners his trails was a very cool gig for him.  The views were breathtaking.

Sky looking for the goats

Sky looking for the goats

We hiked back to town through another gauntlet of vendors.  On the way down the hill I bought some “Moroccan Nutella”, a delicious mix of honey, almonds and Argan oil.  The trail actually cut through restaurants where earthenware tagines roasted over charcoal bricks.  There were couches and chairs with plush, colorful pillows right on the back of the river.  Tourists from all over the planet lounged and enjoyed the Moroccan sun or slept in the shade of brightly colored umbrellas.

Siti Fatma

Setti Fatma

After the hike Mike and the girls had an ice cream reward.

Ice Cream by the river

Ice Cream by the river

Yum!

Yum!

Back at the car Abdul was waiting for us.  We settled in for the drive down the mountain back to the resort.  I didn’t feel like I had seen anything remotely near what life is like in a typical Berber village as promised by our guide.  I did recall that a well traveled friend warned us that we were not going to see the real Morocco.  I am certain that she was correct but we did see the side of Morocco that has embraced visitors. We didn’t see a single person that was unkind and everyone was genuinely welcoming, friendly and quick to share their culture.

We spent our last day in Marrakech by the pool.  We sat in the shade and I researched and wrote about our adventure.  Sky and Savvy swam and met some lovely girls, Georgia and Lexi.

Little girls all over the world play hand games.  They taught each other songs and will no doubt go home and share them with their friends.

Little girls all over the world play hand games. They taught each other songs and will no doubt go home and share them with their friends.

Lexi and Savannah

Lexi and Savannah

Best friends after a day in the sun!

Best friends after a day in the sun!

Our one selfie of the trip! Coronas in Africa!

Our one selfie of the trip! Coronas in Africa!

The next morning we flew back to Spain and when we got off the plane we all took a deep breath of Andalucía. Adventures are great but it also feels really good to get home!

 

Camels, Friends and Belly Dancers

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Camels, Friends and Belly Dancers

Part 3:  Marrakech

For some reason in my North American mind it was very important that we ride camels while in Morocco.  Never mind that there were good roads in Marrakech and that no one was riding around on camels, we still felt compelled to find some camels.  Youssef, our host in Riad Jardin Secret arranged for a driver to meet us outside the rampart wall.  His car was modern and comfortable and stood out amongst the tiny run-down cars that are common in the medina.  He explained that we were off to ride, not camels, but dromedaries.  Camels have 2 humps while dromedaries have only one.  Who knew? As it turns out we really knew nothing about camels/dromedaries. One thing that I have really enjoyed about traveling is learning new interesting facts. Dromedaries are cool!

Here we go, ready to ride some Dromedary!

Here we go, ready to ride some Dromedaries!

Cool camel/dromedary facts:

1. They do not store water in those humps. Nope, the humps are fat.

2. So if the humps don’t store water, how is it that they can go so long without water?  This is the cool part:  Camels are really good at minimizing water losses. First, they have very little urine output and there poop is very, very dry.  Camel urine is as thick as syrup and their poop is so dry it is burned by nomads in the desert for fuel.  Secondly, they don’t lose as much water during breathing as humans do.  Have you noticed that they have unusually large nostrils? Hot air is inhaled and cooled in spiral turbinates in the nose. When air is exhaled it is cooled by the turbinates and water vapor condenses just like dew on grass.  This water is reabsorbed by the camel.

Really big nostrils!

Is this guy smiling for me? Really big nostrils!

3. Even their blood is different! A camel’s red blood cells are actually oval rather than circular like most other mammals.  This facilitates the circulation of blood when they are dehydrated.  It also allows them to tolerate osmotic variations that would kill a human and cause our red blood cells to explode.

4. Camels can tolerate up to a 40% loss of their body weight in water!  That would be like a 180 pound (81 kg) man losing 72 pounds (33 kg) of water!

5. Camels can run 40mph for short stretches and can sustain a speed of 25mph.

6. Camels live 40-50 years.

7. Camels can drink 200 liters (52 gallons) of water in 3 minutes!

Flower?

Flower? Savvy meets her dromedary.

8. Camels tolerate enormous fluctuations in body temperature.  Their body temperature can range from 34 °C (93 °F) when they get up in the morning to 40 °C (104 °F) by sunset!

Now you can fascinate and impress your friends with your new knowledge of camels/dromedaries, an added benefit of following Team Kezmoh!

I think Sky and this dromedary are laughing at the same joke!

I think Sky and this dromedary are laughing at the same joke!

We drove to an area of Marrakech called the Palmerie.  Although the landscape was completely flat, the road twisted between the palms.  Abdul explained to us that it is a crime punishable by fine or imprisonment if you cut down a palm tree.  The trees are older than the road, thus the curves.  Along the way we passed many roadside camel stands just waiting for tourists to come along and rent a ride.

Waiting for some customers

Waiting for some customers

Somehow I thought we would be in the desert and that it would seem less touristy but Marrakech is an oasis and the desert is far away.  The truth is, riding a camel is a bit cliché, I realized.   About 15 minutes from our riad we met our guide and our family of dromedaries.  Team Kezmoh climbed onboard our new friends and had a loop around the Palmerie.  To be completely honest a camel ride is more of a photo op than anything else. We did come across a turtle on the road and our guide saved him from our dromedary train.

Sky the turtle whisperer.

Sky the turtle whisperer.

The highlight of the tour was when we returned to our base.  Our guide led us through the palms where 2 baby dromedaries and their mother were hanging out.

Meeting a baby dromedary.

Meeting a baby dromedary.

The babies were 2 weeks old.  One baby was nursing while his mother ate from a giant pile of leaves. I imagine a 1000 lb animal must have to eat constantly to support a baby that size.

Mama and Baby

Mama and Baby

Posing with our guide.

Posing with our guide.

Team Kezmoh and a baby dromedary

Team Kezmoh and a baby dromedary

When we were satisfied that we had a full camel experience Abdul drove us back to the hotel.  Shortly after we returned our friend Cathy Baker arrived with her daughter Jessica and Jessica’s friend Catherine.   Mike and I work with Cathy back in California. She is a dear friend and she actually is the obstetrician who brought both Sky and Savannah into the world.  Cathy had been a Peace Corps Volunteer before medical school and lived in Oman.  During that time she learned Arabic so she was excited to come to Morocco.  Sky and Savvy were fast friends with our new visitors and the little band of girls quickly disappeared together to explore the riad.

New buddies. Jessica, Savannah, Sky and Catherine.

New buddies. Jessica, Savannah, Sky and Catherine.

That night we asked our hosts Melika and Youssef to recommend a restaurant.  They recommended  Riad Riaffa which promised good food and belly dancing.  We ordered a variety of traditional Moroccan tagines and salads.  Although most Moroccans do not drink alcohol it is available to tourists. We had a bottle of Moroccan wine which was pale in comparison to the delicious Spanish wines that we were used to but still good.

Cheers!

Cheers!

The highlight of our dinner was a belly dancing performance.

Belly dancer in Marrakech

Belly dancer in Marrakech

I have a new appreciation for belly dancing after my time in Spain.  Last September, just after school had started for the girls our friend Amparo approached me on the street with a clip board. She was collecting names to join her in a dance class at the sports pavilion.  She told me that it would be danza del vientre.  Humm, danza del vientre, I did not know what that meant but I was delighted to be asked to join any sort of exercise group so I signed right up.  I thought maybe it would be Flamenco, maybe Zumba, maybe some sort of Spanish dancing.  I arrived on the appointed day dressed to exercise.  I was still too embarrassed to ask what sort of a class I had signed up for and by then I couldn’t even remember what she had called it.  The instructor arrived, she was extremely fit.  This must be Zumba, I thought.  Marta shed her sweat pants and put on a tiny skirt over her tights. The skirt had little metal coins that jingled when she moved.  “OH NO”, belly dancing!

My instructor, Marta Indra

My instructor, Marta Indra

Belly dancing is probably the last type of dance that I am built for.   It did cross my mind to get out of there right away but I stayed and gave it a whirl.  Marta instructed us to practice what we had learned at home.  I went home and demonstrated some of my new moves to the team.  We laughed and laughed, I looked more like a robot than a belly dancer.  Walking home from my second class another student, Laura, explained to me that it wasn’t my fault, “Es que no eres Latina (It’s just that you aren’t Latina)”.  So, no hope for me… I did continue the classes until February when it dwindled from 20 students to 4 and our instructor told us that we were just too few students to make the class worth it for her.  So my own, largely unsuccessful attempts to learn belly dancing definitely gave me a new appreciation for the sport.  The belly dancer who entertained us while we ate was talented and I think I enjoyed the show more than anyone.

Mike is not sure if he should look!

Mike is not sure if he should look!

In the morning we went back to Djemaa el Fna (see Marrakech part 1) with Cathy and the girls. Cathy had promised Jessica a carriage ride around the city. We negotiated a price for 2 carriages and the 4 kids hopped in one while Cathy, Mike and I took up the rear.

American girls on a carriage ride in Marrakech!

California girls on a carriage ride in Marrakech!

Mike and Cathy Baker

Mike with Cathy Baker

Our driver Ali spoke English and Spanish in addition to French and Arabic.  He pointed out the sights as we passed and answered my questions. He was proud to tell me that Marrakech is a city that is open to visitors and that, in his opinion, people of all races were welcome. As we drove past the Royal palace he explained that King Mohammed is a popular and good monarch.

Leslie and Ali

Leslie and Ali

He pointed out storks that nest on the rampart wall to the 3 obstetricians in his carriage.

See the stork nesting on the rampart wall?

See the stork nesting on the rampart wall?

We trotted out of the medina and into an area of luxury hotels and upscale stores such as Louis Vuitton.  Once back in the medina we stopped at a spice store where we were given a tour of the wonderful herbs.  The smells in the store were divine. I bought a sac of spices that our guide promised was a mixture of 45 spices, “the secret to Moroccan cooking”.  I have enough spice to flavor our cooking for years.  (If anyone wants a bit please let me know!).

Spices

Spices

Pigments for local painters

Pigments for local painters

When our carriage tour of Marrakech was completed we plunged back into the chaos of Djemaa el Fna.  I passed a wrinkled man sitting at  a little table.  As we approached he quickly covered his display with a large piece of cardboard.  How odd, all of the other vendors called to us as we passed. He was quite obviously not interested in our little band of Americans. This piqued my curiosity.  I stood apart from our group and watched him from a distance until he uncovered his table.  TEETH! It was a gruesome display of molars and other various teeth.  He was a Berber dentist!  I later read that these “dentists” will extract a tooth for you right there at their card table!

A Berber dentist.  Photo from Google images

A Berber dentist. Photo from Google images

We spent the afternoon exploring and shopping.

This guy is carrying a bundle of live, squaking chickens.

This guy is carrying a bundle of live, squawking chickens.

A cool lamp shop The vendor with Sky and Cathy

A cool lamp shop
The vendor with Sky and Cathy

Sky, Mike, Savannah, Cathy, Jessica and Katherine

Sky, Mike, Savannah, Cathy, Jessica and Catherine

Delicious pineapple and coconut sold by the piece

Delicious pineapple and coconut sold by the piece

Jessica and Catherine were keen to get some henna as well so we went back to the Henna Cafe.

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For dinner that night we enjoyed our best restaurant meal of the year at Le Comptoir du Pacha. The restaurant was around the corner from our riad and was owned by an enthusiastic Frenchman.  He seemed genuinely happy to meet us and gave us a tour around his place.  The food was an incredible mix of French and Moroccan styles.  If you make it to Marrakech I’d highly recommend his place.

My appetizer, yum!

My appetizer, yum!

Part 4  coming soon!

 

Team Kezmoh goes to Granada

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November 2013 ALHAMBRATeam Kezmoh goes to Granada and picks up our second visitor!

Our friend Carolina arrived on the train in Granada. You may recall from previous posts that Carolina is the young woman from Sevilla, una sevillana, who came to stay with us in California last summer.  In November she was on break from the Universidad de Sevilla where she is studying education.  After her stay with us last summer Carolina became part of our family so we were very excited that she made the 3 hour train trip to visit us. We picked her up at the train station in Granada. There seems to be endless construction in the center of town so we drove in circles until we were all dizzy. We finally parked the car and walked to the train station.  Lovely Caro was waiting for us on the steps. The girls ran to hug her, happy to see her smiling face. From the train station we walked to the Plaza de los Toros where we had lunch at El Coso which is a lovely place located literally under the bleachers of the bull-fighting stadium.  We are not fans of bull-fighting so this was as close as we will make it to a bull fight. The service and the food were exceptional. Our waiter was really funny and left a lasting impression with the girls.

El Coso in the Plaza de Toros

El Coso in the Plaza de los Toros

Beautifully presented dishes

Beautifully presented dishes

Sea Bass

Sea Bass

After lunch we snaked up switch-backs to our hotel, La Hostel Ninfa in the Realejo neighborhood of Granada.

Hostal La Ninfa

Hostal La Ninfa. Notice the big ceramic Pomegranate, a “Granada”. Granada literally means pomegranate and images of pomegranates are everywhere

I chose the hotel for it’s proximity to the Alhambra and the cool pictures of the facade on the internet. It was not easy to find but using the GPS we managed.  It is owned by a German woman and her Moroccan husband who is an artist.  It is decorated inside and out with painted ceramic plates and stars.  We had a lovely view of the sunset when we arrived. That night we paid the price in sleep deprivation for being close to tourist sights and restaurants with noisy people and cars in the streets below. The best part of Hostal La Ninfa was a surprise. There was a great park across the street. The kids never wanted to leave and any future outing had to include a stop at the park before and after.

Thanks to Carolina for the cool pictures!

Thanks Carolina for these cool pictures!

woo whooo!

woo hooo!

In the morning we had breakfast at a little restaurant across the plaza called El Campo del Principe.

Churros and tostada con tomate for breakfast

Churros and tostada con tomate for breakfast

By the Christmas tree after breakfast

By the Christmas tree after breakfast

Mike, Carolina, Sky, Savvy and I hiked up a very steep hill to the Alhambra.  I was thankful  that the girls were fit and old enough to walk because it was not long ago that we would have been carrying them up a hill like this.

The walk from the Albacín up to the Alhambra

The walk from the Albaicín up to the Alhambra

The Alhambra is considered an obligatory tourist attraction on a visit to Granada. It is the most visited tourist attraction in Spain and has more than 2 million visitors/year.

Ready to see the Alhambra

Ready to see the Alhambra

It was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1984. The Alhambra is one of the best preserved Arabic palaces of its time.  It was finished around 1333 during the Nasrid dynasty. The Moors enjoyed a peaceful reign until 1492 when Queen Isabel I and King Ferdinand ordered an invasion. When the Catholic monarchs conquered Granada they ended 8 centuries of Arab rule in the Iberian Peninsula. After 1492 the Alhambra was used by the Christian rulers.  It fell into disrepair a century later and was at times inhabited by vagrants and was even used as soldiers’ barracks during Napoleonic times. The American author, Washington Irving, who wrote The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and who is famous for his travels in Spain lived in the Alhambra.  During his time in the Alhambra, he was inspired to write his book, The Tales of the Alhambra in 1829.

A plaque in Washington Irving's room at the Alhambra

“Washington Irving wrote his Tales of the Alhambra in these rooms in the year 1829”                                                            A plaque in Washington Irving’s room at the Alhambra

To get the most out of our visit to the Alhambra we scheduled a guided tour.  We wore headphones so we could hear our guide while he walked ahead.  He was very knowledgeable but seemed to be giving the tour more for his own performance than for the group’s benefit.

Carolina and Sky with our guide

See what I mean?  Carolina, Savannah and Sky with our guide

Explaining the courtyard of the lions

Beautiful architecture

The intricate interiors of the Alhambra are amazing. 

Under Islamic law, no depictions of living beings (people, plants or animals) were allowed.  Instead, the walls and ceilings are covered with symbolic, geometrical patterns, as well as verses from the Koran.  

 

Decorated with geometric patterns

Decorated with geometric patterns and Arabic phrases

There are eight-pointed stars, representing the convergence of heaven and earth wherever one looks.  Once we learned about this, the 8 pointed stars were like “hidden Mickeys” and we found them everywhere. The Alhambra was built with wood, plaster and brick.  Interestingly ,these materials were chosen not to last, implying humility before Allah.  This was also the reason for the intentional occasional gap or irregularity in the design, since aspiring to perfection was considered blasphemous.

A ceiling once painted multiple colors

The ceiling was once painted multiple colors

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURESThe view of Granada from the Alhambra is amazing around every turn.

Mike with his tour guide headphones

Mike with his tour guide headphones

My favorite view :)

My favorite view 🙂

Granada

Granada

Carolina, Leslie and Savvy

Carolina, Leslie and Savvy

Within and around the palaces the gardens are endless. They have an amazing system of irritation that dates back to the construction of the Alhambra.  IMG_5745

 

Sky

Sky

Team Kezmoh at the Alhambra

Team Kezmoh at the Alhambra

Beautiful walkways

Beautiful walkways

The Alhambra tour was beautiful but exhausting and by the end we were ready for a rest.  We hiked back down the hill, stopped, of course, at the park…  My idea of resting and Sky and Savvy’s is not the same! SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

 

 

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We had dinner at our hotel’s pizzeria restaurant across the square.

Cool ceramics everywhere

Cool ceramics everywhere

It had the same decor as the hotel which was more interesting than the food.  The girls had a lot of fun taking pictures.IMG_5713 IMG_5707

Team Kezmoh, eating again

Team Kezmoh, eating again

The next day we explored the Parque de las Ciencias which was highly recommended for children.  Einstein was sitting out front so we paused to pose for a picture with him.

Savannah and Sky with Albert

Savannah and Sky with Albert

The Parque de las Ciencias is huge. Our favorite section was el viaje del cuerpo humano (the voyage through the human body)  which included really cool stuff like a video of a live human birth.

Very cool for kids to see a birth

Very cool for kids to see a birth. Sky decided to skip it.

There were exhibits of other animals as well. Savannah really liked the preserved hearts.  There was a preserved whale heart next to a tiny human heart.

Whale heart!

Whale heart!

I especially liked the exhibit of the smoker lung compared to the healthy lung.  Outside there was a mariposario (butterfly house) which was a bit of a disappointment compared to the butterfly park that we visited in Benalmádena near Malaga.  However, we love all butterfly parks so it was a mandatory stop for us.  There were outside gardens, a giant chess board, Marie Curie, and lots of activities for the kids. We spent the entire day there and only saw a fraction of the place.

Savvy, not thrilled to be posing with one the most famous female scientists of all time.

Savvy, not thrilled to be posing with one the most famous female scientists of all time.

Cool activities

Cool activities

Carolina photographing the butterflies

Carolina photographing the butterflies

Stick Bugs

Mike checking out the Stick Bugs

In this exhibit everyone felt small.

In this exhibit everyone felt small.

 

We explored Granada on our way back to the hotel.  We were hungry so I checked Trip Advisor and found a recommended Mexican restaurant.  Team Kezmoh and Carolina love Mexican food!

Leslie, Savvy, Carolina, Sky and Mike waiting for our burritos. Does the wall look familiar to anyone! Love it!

Leslie, Savvy, Carolina, Sky and Mike waiting for our burritos. Does the wall look familiar to anyone?  Love it!

We found Chile Grande Cantina Mexicana, a little bit of Mexico in the heart of Granada and we were not disappointed.

Ole!

Ole!

We had Coronas with lime, chips, guacamole and burritos.  We stayed until they closed for their break before dinner (which in Spain starts at 8pm). Carolina posed with the cool waitstaff on their way home outside.

Carolina posing with the staff of Chile Grande Cantina Mexicana

Carolina posing with the staff of Chile Grande Cantina Mexicana

We passed the rest of the evening playing at the park outside of the hotel. In the morning we headed back to Alhama de Granada.

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Spinning round and round and round with crazy hair!!!!!

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Silly girls on the swings.

It was a full weekend! Luckily Carolina stayed for the rest of the week so the girls were able to give her a tour of our pueblo. She stayed with them while we had our adventure to Nerja (see previous post).

If anyone has questions about visiting Granada with kids feel free to send me a comment. By the time I send this I will have been back several times.